Traumatization Therapeutic approach - Is Trauma Remedy Right For You? from Frankie Creehan's blog

The previous 10 years has seen a change in hypnosis with the arrival of Havening procedure. A mental treatment that quickly takes care of highly stressful and traumatic memories. Effectively it turbochargers psychotherapy, going from months of weekly sessions to just a handful of sessions.

You can see why that the system is favoured by some of today's top professionals. In a nutshell Havening therapy has two components, therapy and retrieval therapy. The therapy is normally delivered by trained psychotherapists. In some rare circumstances a qualified nurse or therapist can do the retrieval therapy.

In Havening retrieval, therapy and therapy can be delivered separately or as a blended treatment. The process is usually delivered in between other therapies such as CBT or NLP. Typically, I will then work with the client either alone or in combination with other therapies.

It is not unusual for a client to go through the retrieval process alone. This is because the trauma has already been retrieved and dealt with. In this situation the client will see a psychologist when they need support, not when they have completed the retrieval process.

The retrieval process can often be a long one, particularly if the trauma is not yet totally retrieved. It is not unusual for a person to need up to two years to complete the full program. This is why there is a transition period between sessions. During this period the client can continue work or undertake their own therapy. The therapist will often work with the client in terms of assessing progress and helping them achieve their goals.

Havening Therapy is a structured, evidence-based process. The therapy involves the following three areas:

* Interpersonal therapy: this includes ways to deal with traumatic memories and preventing them from interfering with daily relationships.

This would be delivered by a qualified therapist who knows how to effectively convey and listen empathy when discussing a client's experience. In a Havening Therapy context the therapist's role is to listen to the client and help them to make sense of their memories. She will assist the client to make contact with the parts of their brain that help to organize their memories. The therapist will also help the client to understand how they learned to interpret their memories.

The therapist will help the client to get back to the events, people and things the memories describe. She will encourage the client to recall these for themselves rather than relying on the therapist's interpretation.

This therapist will help the client to understand what actually happened. If it turns out that the memory is inaccurate, she will help the client to correct the inaccuracy.

The therapist will also help the client to get back into touch with the events, people and things the memories refer to. She will help the client to remember and reflect on what was happening at the time of the trauma.

The Havening Therapy process is evidence-based and was developed by psychologist John Haven. It is also known as Autobiographical Compassion Therapy and it has been used by numerous psychologists since its introduction in 1991. Havening Therapy can be delivered by a trained clinician or a qualified friend or family member.

The Havening Therapy therapy includes face-to-face encounters with the client. A qualified relative or friend can administer the therapy if the client is unwilling to meet with the therapist. There are no medications prescribed.

The therapy is a structured process that entails a first session, where the client is encouraged to recall the traumatic experience. The client does a trauma therapy session to help them to focus on what is most painful about the memory and to help them to accept it and not avoid or repress it.

In this session, the client is helped to focus on one aspect of the memory that is triggering the trauma, such as a smell, a sound or a color. This memory integration process can be repeated until the client can freely incorporate the trauma memory into their memories and move onto the next stage of the therapy.

Trauma therapy has been well-established in research and treatment. It has been demonstrated to be effective for those who have survived or are currently living with a serious traumatic event. Its effectiveness has also been established for those with dissociative amnesia and as a way to treat dissociative Identity Disorder, and anyone suffering Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

The therapy works best when delivered by a trained clinician, preferably one who has special training in trauma and dissociative disorders. Some therapists do charge a fee for some stages of the therapy, although the majority of therapists do not.

Havening Therapy can be delivered by a trained clinician, preferably one who has special training in trauma and dissociative disorders. This is the only way the therapy can really be effective. In its current form, it is not cost-effective as it is provided free-of-charge. Some therapists do charge a fee for some stages of the therapy, although the majority of therapists do not.


In a nutshell Havening therapy has two components, therapy and retrieval therapy. In Havening therapy, therapy and retrieval can be delivered separately or as a blended treatment. In a Havening Therapy context the therapist's role is to listen to the client and help them to make sense of their memories. The Havening Therapy therapy includes face-to-face encounters with the client. The client does a trauma therapy session to help them to focus on what is most painful about the memory and to really help them to accept it and not stay clear of or repress it.


Previous post     
     Next post
     Blog home

The Wall

No comments
You need to sign in to comment